#Millennials #GenerationY

Before we get started with this book review….yes I said book review (did the title throw you off?? #sorrynotsorry), let me start off with a little bit of background information for those of you who might not know what/who a millennial is.

Millennials, also referred to as generation Y, applies to individuals who reached adulthood around the turn of the 21st century. The term is credited to the authors of the book Generations: The History of America’s Future, 1584 to 2069; Neil Howe and William Strauss. They specifically defined the term as related to any individual that was born between 1982 and 2004.

Millennials grew up in an electronic-filled and increasingly developing online world filled with social-networking and caring about how many likes your statuses and photos get. Though most like to associate negative thoughts and ideas with millennials I feel that often times there are other aspects of this group of people that are often overlooked (also don’t forget you can’t just assume that someone born between ’82 and ’04 has every trait that a millennial is supposed to have…I don’t think I do and I was born in ;92!). Anyways, this generation is generally the most ethnically diverse generation and were raised in a time where they could be very tolerant to differences instead of lashing out or critical of people/things for their difference.

The biggest thing associated with millennials is technology. Unlike some generations, millennials grew up with computers and the internet. I remember being in middle school and rushing home to get my homework done so that I could spend hours making my AIM (AOL instant messager) away message was perfect…and then once it was I would sit there and wait for someone I wanted to talk to, to come on and I would suddenly come back from being “away”…yeah that was a thing. Oh, and please don’t even get me started on Myspace…..the top friends list….that was stressful…and the profile pictures….nope don’t even want to talk about it!  That leads me perfectly into what this book is about….

 

First of all the book is called Startup and is written by a writer for Buzzfeed, Doree Shafrir. This book is fittingly all about tech culture in New York City. But it is honestly much more than just a book about millennials and their life in tech culture in the city. It focuses on what it is like for journalists to chase a story down and get it up and running; it looks at how we use apps to navigate us through our daily lives…sometimes the simplest of tasks…there’s an app for that! But what I love the most about this book is how it focuses on how things have evolved throughout this digital age.

This workplace drama filled with Snapchats and anonymous Twitter accounts centers around a modern yet also timeless issue….love affairs in the workplace! It is also a story of youth, ambition, relationships and their fallouts, ethics in journalism, bromances, sexting, and so much more! The subtle twists and turns in this book are what really made it an enjoyable read for me.

I would really like to see another book in the future….after reading the book and pondering on it for a while I realize now that I have a lot of questions that I need answered. Which I will not share because if you are going to go get the book then well…it would spoil it for you and I don’t want to do that! But even with some unanswered questions, this was a good read and I hope some of you will check it out too!

Have you read Startup? What did you think??
Are you technically considered a Millennial? Do you agree or disagree with the definition of a Millennial?

Leave your thoughts in the comments below!

Xoxo, Shelby

 

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271 Pages and Still I Needed More…

 

Have you ever read a book and not been 100% sure what was going on but you still wanted more? That was how I felt while reading Lucky You by Erika Carter.

I know that you’re probably thinking “umm if you don’t like it then why did you continue to read it?” Well, I can tell you that Carter’s writing was a huge part of what kept me reading. Her writing kept me glued and sucked in, so for that I loved it. But I also wanted so much more, and that was the worst part.

When I chose this book as my January selection for Book of the Month Club, I chose it because I felt that a book about twenty-somethings trying to find themselves would be right up my alley. I mean I am a twenty-something, granted I’m not trying to find myself but I felt like I might be able to relate a little bit. But I was wrong.

Before I get into my full review on the book I want to say this…

If you’re looking for a book about life, just something different from your own then this book might be of interest to you. There’s no big plot twist or anything that is going to completely blow your mind away, so if that’s what you’re looking for then look elsewhere.

I do feel that reading this book, a book that follows a group of people who make a choice to go off the grid for a year, especially in a world where we are so focused on technology and social media could be a good thing for everyone to experience. I mean haven’t you ever just wanted to unplug for just a day?!? I know I have! Sometimes the things I see on social media just drive me insane!

I challenge you to head to the library and check this book out. Give it a fair chance despite the other reviews that have been written online.

Now on to the review….

Part of me felt completely lost while I read this book. I couldn’t connect with any of the characters. I found that I couldn’t relate to any of them on a personal level. I kept waiting and wishing that something would happen to give them a different path. Something that would allow them to grow, to mature, something to change the path of the story..

As I continued to read I kept holding onto this false sense of hope that I would be able to connect with just one of the characters in this book. I desperately wanted to connect with even just one character, even if it was just for a moment. But the more I read…the more I realized that probably wasn’t going to happen. Making a small connection to any of the characters, finding something that would help me to like them probably would’ve helped me to like this book a little more…but….nothing. Not having that…made this book difficult to read.

I felt that Ellie, Chloe and Rachel were unpleasant people. The background stories of each character were unclear and lacking in detail. Maybe I couldn’t connect with any of these women because I have not experienced anything that they had went through in this book. I loved the whole idea of the book, I just wish I could’ve connected with them more.

Now I don’t want to go too much into detail about why they are where they are just in case you want to read this book. So I will end my review there.

How do you feel about reading a book that you can’t connect to? How do you feel about reading a book that you don’t particularly care for? I’m the type of person that when I start a book I have to finish it, no matter what! Tell me in the comments below if you feel the same. Happy Reading!

Xo’s Shelby